Qa’a Al-Yahood

Qa'a Al-Yahood

Author: Ali Al-Amir

Publishing House: Al Nabigha For Publishing & Distributing

Publication Year: 2018

Genre: Novel

Number of Pages: 383

In Ali Al-Amir’s novel Qa’a al-Yahood, the story unfolds mostly in an old neighborhood of Sanaa called Qa’a al-Yahood. The narrative centers on Khaled, a Saudi student whose father hails from Jazan and whose mother is from Yemen. Owning clinics in both Jazan and Asir, Khaled’s father dreams of seeing him become a doctor. However, unable to secure admission to Saudi universities, Khaled sets off to study pharmacy in Sanaa.

Shielded from his father, Khaled indulges in pleasure, neglecting studies due to wealth and good looks. He finds himself enamored with three different women: Munira, who draws her influence from an unnamed, yet powerful figure in the country; Sabriya, a Shia girl belonging to the lower strata of society and living in Qa’a al-Yahood; and Loza, the last remaining Jew in the neighborhood, whose family carefully conceals their religious identity. Working alongside Munira in a dance troupe and her bridal dress shop, Loza masquerades as a Muslim to both Munira and her lover.

the complex interplay of love, religion, and social stratification in a Saudi-Yemeni context, makes the novel an intriguing read.

In Ali Al-Amir’s novel Qa’a al-Yahood, the story unfolds mostly in an old neighborhood of Sanaa called Qa’a al-Yahood. The narrative centers on Khaled, a Saudi student whose father hails from Jazan and whose mother is from Yemen. Owning clinics in both Jazan and Asir, Khaled’s father dreams of seeing him become a doctor. However, unable to secure admission to Saudi universities, Khaled sets off to study pharmacy in Sanaa.

Shielded from his father’s gaze, Khaled, enticed by wealth and charm, forsakes his studies for indulgence.

He finds himself enamored with three different women: Munira, who draws her influence from an unnamed, yet powerful figure in the country; Sabriya, a Shia girl belonging to the lower strata of society and living in Qa’a al-Yahood; and Loza, the last remaining Jew in the neighborhood, whose family carefully conceals their religious identity.

In Munira’s dance troupe and bridal dress shop, Loza pretends to be Muslim to both Munira and her lover.

the complex interplay of love, religion, and social stratification in a Saudi-Yemeni context, makes the novel an intriguing read.

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