The American Granddaughter

The American Granddaughter

Publishing House: Bloomsbury USA

Publication Year: 2010

Genre: Novel

Number of Pages: 192

In The American Granddaughter, Inaam Kachachi portrays the dual tragedy of her native land: America’s failure and the humiliation of Iraq.

The American Granddaughter portrays the American occupation of Iraq through the eyes of a young Iraqi-American woman. Returning to her country as a US Army interpreter, the narrator’s conflicting emotions reveal the tragedy of a nation that, having fought to emerge from dictatorship, now faces foreign occupation.

During the U.S. occupation of Iraq, Zeina, believing her strong-willed grandmother was her sole family in Iraq, takes on the disapproved role of interpreter for the American forces.

Surprisingly, Zeina unexpectedly encounters Haider and Muhaymin, who are previously unknown siblings and falls for Muhaymin—an active member of the Al Mehdi Army—prompting a reassessment of her core beliefs.

We embraced this emotionally faithful novel depicting a country and a woman torn between two shores.

The American Granddaughter Raises important questions about identity, belonging, and patriotism.

Following its shortlisting for IPAF, The American Granddaughter underwent translation into other languages, with the most recent edition being in English through the Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation.

We embraced this emotionally faithful novel depicting a country and a woman torn between two shores.

The descriptive, Iraq-based chapters during the war were easy to get hooked on.

The well-described plight of Iraqi-Americans during the “War on Terror” is a timely story that needs telling.

Read More About Inaam Kachachi

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